Friday, March 4, 2016

The Cold Waters of the Teiglin

Hope for Turin and Nienor

The very last line of the altogether tragic story of Turin Turambar and his sister/wife (that relationship being the primary tragedy), Nienor, is as follows:

"The curse of Morgoth came to its fulfilment when shortly after Túrin slew himself on his sword by the brink of Cabed-en-Aras. A grave was then raised for him, and upon it was set the Stone of the Hapless with carvings in Cirth:

TÚRIN TURAMBAR DAGNIR GLAURUNGA

NIENOR NÍNIEL

But the body of Nienor was not there, "nor was it ever known whither the cold waters of Teiglin had taken her."

Free stock photo of water, rocks, creek, stream
This of course follows Nienor's dreadful leap to her death off a cliff and into the Teiglin river and Turin's subsequent suicide by the sword.  

The ending of this chapter is very abrupt and sort of disquieting--Nienor's body never is buried and no one has ever found it.  But in thinking over this section and the story as a whole, this fact not only brings a sense of uncertainty, but through that, a sense of hope.

It is mentioned time and time again in The Silmarillion that one of the strangest and yet most beautiful things about Men is that they are free from the circles of the world, and they go the elves "know not wither".

It is generally accepted that Morgoth was the victor in the story of Turin Turambar.  However, the fact that Nienor and Turin were able to escape his torture and find "liberty in death" shows that he does not ultimately have the mastery over Men and over Nienor and Turin.

Ultimately, the elves know not wither the spirits of Men go, and neither is it known where either Nienor's body or her spirit have gone.  Perhaps her spirit has gone to be with Eru and in tht case it is forever free of the grasp of Morgoth.

There's my idea--any one have more ideas to expand upon that?

8 comments:

  1. YES!!!! EXACTLY my thoughts!!!! I just read that part for the first time this morning!!! I am currently reading the Sil, and it is SOOOOOO amazing!!!!

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    1. Wow, what a coincidence! Yay, I'm glad you're reading the Sil!

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    2. Oh! You're reading Silmarillion? That is my favorite of all the Lord of the Rings series. ^_^

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  2. Yes, that's the only thing that gives me any comfort after that story... maybe they're happy in the aferlife... :'(

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    1. I love how Prof. Tolkien kept that in there--it prevents me from getting too depressed by their story :'(

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  3. I love the story of Túrin Turimbar! It's probably my favorite from The Silmarillion. I'm not sure why I like it so much considering it's such a tragic story but I do. I prefer it though in it's more complete form in The Children of Húrin.

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    1. I like COH better also, but I think the Sil version does a good job of highlighting important points. It is interesting how tragic stories are often so beautiful...

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